University Health Service

1. Schedule your appointment – timing is important!

At UHS, you will meet with a clinician to discuss the method, and if appropriate, get an IUD or implant inserted, possibly at the same visit.

For IUD (not implant), you will also need to schedule another visit 4-6 weeks after insertion.

To schedule, please answer these questions, then call (734) 764-8320:

IUD scheduling diagram - Description below

2. Determine how you will handle cost and payment:

You are responsible for payment, so you will want to learn costs and what your insurance will cover. See Contraception Costs, Payment and Insurance.

3.  Just before and when you arrive for your appointment:

  • Eat something light before your appointment.
  • Don’t urinate just before arrival, because you will give a urine sample for a pregnancy test.
  • To manage any pain, take pain medication 30 minutes before you arrive, either 600 mg of Motrin (ibuprofen) or 1000 mg of Tylenol (acetaminophen).

4.  Keep in mind timing for your visits:

  • Plan to rest at UHS for 10-15 minutes after the insertion.

5. Self-care at home:

  • You may experience light bleeding (spotting) for 1-3 months.
  • For pain, you may take an over-the-counter medicine, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), and naproxen (Aleve) if needed, following label instructions.
  • For IUD:
    • You may experience cramping, for which you can use a hot water bottle or heating pad.
    • Don’t insert anything into your vagina for 24 hours, e.g. no intercourse, tampons or douching.

6. Protect against sexually transmitted infections (STI):

  • An IUD or implant do not protect against any STI, e.g. gonorrhea and chlamydia.
  • Using condoms is the most effective way to reduce risk of STI. For U-M students, free safer sex supplies are available at UHS Wolverine Wellness.
  • Consider that fewer partners usually means less risk of STI.

7.  When should you get help?

Call 911 if you think you may need emergency care, e.g. if:

  • You pass out (lose consciousness)
  • You have sudden, severe pain in your belly

Call UHS (see below) or seek urgent medical care if you:

  • Have fever greater than 100.4° F (38° C)
  • Have new belly pain that is not relieved with ibuprofen or acetaminophen, or pain that is getting worse
  • Have severe vaginal bleeding, that is, passing clots of blood and soaking through your usual pads or tampons every hour up to 2 hours
  • Feel dizzy or lightheaded, or like you may faint
  • Have foul-smelling vaginal discharge

If an IUD is expelled or the strings feel longer, the IUD may be out of place. Call UHS Women’s Health Clinic and use an alternate form of contraception until it is re-inserted.

Not sure what to do? You may call UHS for Nurse Advice, day or night (see numbers below).

Contact us:

Women’s Health Clinic and Appointment scheduling: 734-764-8320

Nurse Advice, day or night: 734-764-8320

Patient portal at myuofmhealth.org (not for urgent concerns)


Image Description - IUD insertion scheduling diagram

Are you currently using the pill, patch, ring, shot, IUD or implant for contraception?

If Yes - Are you using this method consistently and correctly?

If Yes - You may schedule for any time during your menstrual period, but don't schedule for a day that you need to feel your best, e.g. for a test or big event, or will travel.

If No - You must schedule for when you are having your period (day 1-7). Do not have sexual intercourse during your period. And don't schedule for a day that you need to feel your best, e.g. for a test or big event, or will travel.

Are you currently using the pill, patch, ring, shot, IUD or implant for contraception?

If No - You must schedule for when you are having your period (day 1-7). Do not have sexual intercourse during your period. And don't schedule for a day that you need to feel your best, e.g. for a test or big event, or will travel.

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